Blog

NGN Update: What you need to know now

By Susan Sportsman, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

The Next Generation NCLEX (NGN) has been “top of mind” for the Nursing Education community for at least the last two years. Last month Elsevier Education offered a three-hour workshop, highlighting Dr. Phil Dickison, Chief Operating Officer of the National Council of State Board of Nursing (NCSBN), and two nurse educators, Dr. Linda Silvestri and Dr. Donna Ignatavicius. This webinar focused on the most up-to-date information about the NGN.

In his presentation, Dr. Dickison gave some important information of which we should all be aware as we continue our journey toward preparing our students for the NGN. Here are several points that I felt were particularly helpful. Continue reading “NGN Update: What you need to know now”

Improving Engagement in Synchronous Online Learning

This blog explores the importance of engagement and focuses on some instructional concepts and approaches that can be utilized within a Zoom environment to expand engagement.

By Andrew Bobal, EdD

Today’s instruction in a COVID world is drastically different than it was just twelve months ago. Courses and programs that were never taught online have been thrust into the online world without choice; this is true for instructors as well. One the biggest hurdles with online synchronous Continue reading “Improving Engagement in Synchronous Online Learning”

Resilience

By Cathy Converse

“What’s comin’ will come and we’ll meet it when it does.” –Hagrid

Have you ever thought about the relationship between success and failure? Sure, they’re opposites, but they also go hand in hand more often than we think. Success is almost always built upon failed attempts. Almost every successful person we can think of has actually failed numerous times or has overcome significant hardships. J. K. Rowling and Stephen King were rejected by publishers many times before landing book deals that launched incredibly successful careers. Joe Biden overcame a severe stutter to become President of the United States. The Ford Motor Company was the third automobile company Henry Ford started—the first two went bankrupt. Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison were notoriously poor students.

And yet, these people, and many more like them, went on to incredible success. There may have been many reasons they were able to overcome tough times, but almost certainly one of these was that they were resilient. Continue reading “Resilience”

Connectivity

By Susan Sportsman, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

Those of us who have worked in an environment that lifts us up, encouraging our commitment to the mission of the organization and the people we work with, know how fortunate we were to be in such a situation. When we are lucky enough to be a part of this type of organization, our work may not be easy, but it seems worth the effort we put into it. We recognize that leadership throughout the organization strongly influences the work environment, but what do leaders in this type of organization do to stimulate our commitment?

Our literature review regarding Courageous Leadership suggests that one characteristic, Connectivity, may be responsible for Continue reading “Connectivity”

Trustworthiness

By Cathy Converse

If you’ve ever worked in an environment where trust is in short supply, you know how debilitating it can be. Work goes undone as people scramble to protect themselves and try to distinguish fact from fiction. Gossip increases and morale declines. Creativity and innovation come to a screeching halt. Trustworthiness is driven by an organization’s leaders, and it is one of the ten characteristics of courageous leadership, our research has determined. Continue reading “Trustworthiness”

Honesty

By Susan Sportsman, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

 We often hear colleagues say, “To be honest…” Although this phrase is typically only used for emphasis, I always think to myself, “If you are being honest now, WHEN were you NOT honest?” My immediate reaction illustrates how important the perception of honesty is in human interaction. Nowhere is honesty more critical than in the leadership arena. For this reason, honesty is one of the ten characteristics of Courageous Leadership. Continue reading “Honesty”

Decisiveness

By Cathy Converse

Have you ever been in a meeting where the only decision that was made was to have another meeting? Chances are you have been—I certainly have. And if you’re particularly unlucky, you’ve been in a string of such meetings, where over the course of weeks or months no definitive decisions are made, and consequently no action is taken, and no progress is made.

Whether you are the leader or a participant in such a meeting, a lack of decisiveness can be frustrating at best, and yet leaders often struggle with Continue reading “Decisiveness”

Developing Clinical Judgment in an Online Environment

By Susan Sportsman, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

Perhaps the most critical challenge we face is to ensure that our graduates are competent when making clinical judgements appropriate for novice nurses. Developing this competence has always been important—after all, effective clinical judgment is what keeps the clients we serve safe. However, the implementation of the Next Generation NCLEX (NGN) by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) in 2023 has brought this need into prominence. At the same time, the pandemic has created the need to deliver more instruction for nursing students in an online format. Let’s look at four principles to help us achieve the outcomes of developing novice nurses who make effective clinical judgment the core of their nursing practice, all of which can be implemented in an online setting. Continue reading “Developing Clinical Judgment in an Online Environment”

Student Remediation Programs Make Success Possible for Nursing Students

By Susan Sportsman, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

“Ashley” was admitted to a nursing program with several challenges. She had dropped out of high school at 15 because she was pregnant; she got married and had a baby at 16; and was divorced at 17. For years, she worked at low paying jobs to support her son, although her dream was to become a nurse. Her grades in high school were not great because she rarely went to class. Finally, at 30 years of age, encouraged by a nurse who was the mother of one of her son’s friends, she successfully completed a GED exam and slowly began to take the required courses to apply for a nursing program. Her grades, although not stellar, were sufficient to make her competitive for admission. Her math score on the admission test was extraordinarily high, despite a low reading comprehensive score, which made her admission possible. Continue reading “Student Remediation Programs Make Success Possible for Nursing Students”

Tell Me What You See: Workplace Bullying and Storytelling

By Laura Dzurec, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, ANEF, FAAN

I never cease to be impressed by the power of stories. It doesn’t matter whether I’m with my grandchildren, in front of a classroom full of nursing students, or working on a research report, it’s stories—not my careful recitation of facts and figures—that are the glue attracting and holding audience consideration and attention. There is incredible power in stories. Like this one: Continue reading “Tell Me What You See: Workplace Bullying and Storytelling”